Photos From the Field

Hardscrabble Avalanche Overview Hardscrabble Avalanche Overview -Nov 21, 2014

This slide broke on a 40 degree slope. The debris was not deep enough to bury a person, but could have caused trauma due to the exposed rocks. Photo: GNFAC

Hardscrabble Avalanche Pit Hardscrabble Avalanche Pit -Nov 21, 2014

This broke on facets formed during two weeks of cold weather. It broke 6-12 inches deep, about 100 feet wide and ran about 300 feet vertical. Photo: GNFAC

Hardscrabble Avalanche Hardscrabble Avalanche -Nov 20, 2014

This skier triggered avalanche broke about 6 inches deep on a layer of obvious facets capped by a wind slab. It occurred on a South to Southeast facing slope. Photo: J. Hall

Hardscrabble Avalanche Debris Hardscrabble Avalanche Debris -Nov 20, 2014

The debris from this slide ran into exposed rocks. Avalanches early season can cause serious tramua because the snowpack is so thin. Photo: J. Hall

Hardscrabble Avalanche Crown Hardscrabble Avalanche Crown -Nov 20, 2014

This skier triggered avalanche broke about 6 inches deep on a layer of obvious facets capped by a wind slab. It occurred on a South to Southeast facing slope. Photo: J. Hall

Woody Ridge Sluffs Woody Ridge Sluffs -Nov 17, 2014

These fast-moving point release avalanches, also called sluffs, were seen outside Cooke City this weekend. Photo: B. Fredlund

Depth Hoar Depth Hoar -Nov 17, 2014

These crystals changed from snowflakes into angular crystals that are weak and poorly bonded.  They are called depth hoar and they form in thin snowpacks when there are cold temperatures. Depth hoar creates conditions favorable for avalanches later in the winter. Photo: Mark Staples

-8C -8C -Nov 17, 2014

An 8 degree Celcius change in a few inches is a strong temperture difference which drives snow metamorphism. Photo: Mark Staples

0C 0C -Nov 17, 2014

The temperature at the ground stays near freezing (32F or 0 Celcius) all winter long. Photo: Mark Staples

Powder Blast 2014 Powder Blast 2014 -Oct 27, 2014