GNFAC Advisory Podcast https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/feed The daily Avalanche Advisory issued by the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center. en GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Fri Nov 24, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/24 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Fri Nov 24, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/126" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Knoff</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 11/24/2017 - 06:45</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="field field--name-field-audio-file field--type-file field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="audiofield"> <audio controls > <source src="https://www.mtavalanche.com/sites/default/files/audio/2017-Nov-24-06-38-52.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"> Your browser does not support the audio element. </audio> <label>2017-Nov-24-06-38-52.mp3</label> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good Morning and happy Black Friday. This is Eric Knoff with the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Advisory issued on Friday, November 24<sup>th</sup> at 7:00 a.m. Today’s advisory is sponsored by <a href="http://yellowstoneclubfoundation.org/"><strong>Yellowstone Club Community Foundation</strong></a> and <a href="http://stateparks.mt.gov/"><strong>Montana State Parks</strong></a>. This advisory does not apply to operating ski areas. Due to the prolonged period of warm temperatures, Bridger Bowl will not be opening this weekend.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>Overnight a fast moving cold front dropped 2-3” of high density snow in the mountains around Bozeman and Big Sky. The snow line ranged between 8-9,000 ft. and rain fell at lower elevations. The mountains around West Yellowstone and Cooke City picked up a trace to 1” of snow above 9,000 ft. At 5 a.m. snow and rain showers have tapered off and temperatures range from the upper 20’s to mid-30’s F. Winds are blowing 20-40 mph out of the west with ridgetop gusts pushing 50 mph. The Cooke City <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/weather/stations/cooke-city">weather station</a> near Lulu Pass recorded a gust of 79 mph this morning. Today, both precipitation and high winds will diminish as a weak ridge of high pressure builds over the region. Temperatures will warm into the mid to upper 30’s F under partly cloudy skies and winds will blow 15-30 mph out of the west. No snow is expected over the next 24 hours and the rest of the weekend looks to be mostly dry.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "Moderate Avalanche Hazard" alt ="Moderate Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/Moderate.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>If you didn’t get enough mashed potatoes at dinner last night, there should be plenty in the mountains today. The combination of above freezing temperatures and rain at mid to low elevations will turn the snow into a soft and sticky mess. Above 8,500 ft. temperatures have dropped below freezing, which will firm up the snow surface at least during the morning hours.</p> <p>Today, there will be a variety of avalanche problems to look out for. Below 8,500 ft. the main problem will be wet loose avalanches. The lack of freezing temperatures combined with rain has turned the snowpack nearly <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/isothermal" title="When all layers of the snowpack are at the same temperature, usually the freezing pointt. Often refers to a snowpack that is wet throughout its depth." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">isothermal</a> in many locations. This means the snowpack has lost much of its cohesion and strength, which will make wet snow avalanches possible in steep terrain (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/wet-slides-beehive-basin">photo</a></strong>). Be extra cautious when traveling in areas where terrain traps such as creek beds or gullies are present.</p> <p>A secondary avalanche problem will be wind slabs. This hazard will be confined to upper elevation terrain loaded by westerly winds. I don’t expect fresh wind slabs be exceptionally large or touchy, but they will be something to look out for when traveling at higher elevations.</p> <p>In non-wind loaded areas where temps have dropped below freezing the snowpack will be mostly stable. Earlier in the week, Doug and I rode and skied around Cooke City and found mostly stable snow in our snowpits. Even on sunnier aspects, which usually hold shallower and weaker snow, the structure was strong and stable (<strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGMeTxj_YcU&amp;list=PLXu5151nmAvQSYtIfyQP-gMYrlfja6Ls_&amp;index=2">video</a>, <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/digging-pit-scotch-bonnet">photo</a></strong>).</p> <p>Today, the <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/wet-snow-avalanche" title="An avalanche caused by snow losing its strength after becoming damp, moist or saturated with water." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">wet snow avalanche</a> danger is rated <strong><span style = "background-color: #fef102; font-weight: bolder;"><span class = "avayhzrd-moderate">MODERATE</span></span></strong> on mid to low elevation slopes. The <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/dry-snow-avalanche" title="An avalanche that occurs in snow below freezing temperatures." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">dry snow avalanche</a> danger is rated <strong><span style = "background-color: #fef102; font-weight: bolder;"><span class = "avayhzrd-moderate">MODERATE</span></span></strong> on high elevation, wind loaded slopes.</p> <p>If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/node/add/snow_observation">website</a>, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p> <p>Some days the big lines will go, but other days they won't. It's up to you to decide, because the best days are the ones when you return home safely. Three skiers walk through the decision making process in <a href="https://mtavalanche.us17.list-manage.com/track/click?u=6653a830e4819c9e0332778e2&amp;id=9f4e157a92&amp;e=5a2b1f6ecd" target="_blank"><em>Get Avalanche Smart - Episode 3: The Great One.</em></a></p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>Nov. 28, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Play it Again Sports</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Dec. 6, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>Dec. 7, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Dec. 13, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6:30-8 p.m. at Gallatin Valley Snowmobile Association, 4-Corners</p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>WEST YELLOWSTONE</u></p> <p>Dec. 14 and 15, <strong>Snowmobiler Introduction to Avalanches with Field Course</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/25138"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p> <div> <hr /></div> <p>Forecasters’ Choice:</p> <p>Here’s a <a href="https://backcountryaccess.com/portfolio/intro-avalanche-transceivers-ski-snowboard-video/?utm_source=PRO+Ski+Newsletter+-+US+-+Nov+2017&amp;utm_campaign=US+PRO+Ski+Newsletter+-+November+2017&amp;utm_medium=email"><strong>new video series</strong></a> from BCA outlining how to use an <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/avalanche-transceiver" title="An electronic device worn on the body to aide in quickly finding buried avalanche victims. Also called an avalanche beacon, it has the ability to send and receive a 457khz radio signal." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">avalanche transceiver</a> to perform an effective rescue.</p></div> </div> </div> Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:45:59 +0000 Eric Knoff 17889 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Wed Nov 22, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/22 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Wed Nov 22, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1183" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alex Marienthal</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 11/22/2017 - 07:07</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="field field--name-field-audio-file field--type-file field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="audiofield"> <audio controls > <source src="https://www.mtavalanche.com/sites/default/files/audio/2017-Nov-22-07-19-37.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"> Your browser does not support the audio element. </audio> <label>2017-Nov-22-07-19-37.mp3</label> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Alex Marienthal with early season weather and avalanche information from the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Wednesday, November 22<sup>nd</sup> at 7:30 a.m. This information is sponsored by <strong><a href="http://www.montanasearchandrescue.org/files/031Gallatin/Gallatin.html">Gallatin County Search and Rescue</a> </strong>and <strong><a href="http://www.strongholdfabrication.com/">Stronghold Fabrication</a></strong>.<strong> </strong>We will begin to issue daily avalanche advisories and <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/danger-ratings" title="In the U.S., a five-category estimation of the avalanche danger: Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">danger ratings</a> this Friday.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>Snow showers Monday night dropped 4” in the Bridger Range, 1-2” in Hyalite, 3-5” near Big Sky and West Yellowstone, and 7” in Cooke City, with 1-2” more last night. Wind has been west to southwest at 20-30 mph with gusts of 40-50 mph. Temperatures this morning are above freezing up to 9,000’ elevation. There is a chance for light rain this morning, with temperatures in the mid-40s F today and wind out of the west to southwest at 20-30 mph. For Thanksgiving temperatures will reach 50 F, winds of 30-50 mph will precede the passage of a cold front Thursday night, and 2-4” of snow is possible by Friday morning.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>The main avalanche concern today is fresh drifts formed by recent snow and wind. On wind loaded slopes it will be possible to <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/trigger" title="A disturbance that initiates fracture within the weak layer causing an avalanche. In 90 percent of avalanche accidents, the victim or someone in the victims party triggers the avalanche." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">trigger</a> an avalanche. Fresh drifts of snow could be triggered by skiers, climbers, or snowmobilers. Avoid these drifts that are likely found near ridgelines or along the steep edges of gullies. A small <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/slide" title="A mass of snow sliding, tumbling, or flowing down an inclined surface. Same as avalanche." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">slide</a> can be harmful in the wrong terrain, and it is possible for a <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/slide" title="A mass of snow sliding, tumbling, or flowing down an inclined surface. Same as avalanche." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">slide</a> to break deeper into old snow (<a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/big-sky-avalanche-control"><strong>photo</strong></a>).</p> <p>Throughout our advisory area the mountains have 3-5 feet of snow with 6 feet near Cooke City. Heavy, dense snowfall since mid-September was accompanied by relatively warm temperatures to promote a generally stable snowpack with a lack of widespread weak layers. Doug and Eric are in Cooke City where they checked many slopes yesterday and found a deep, stable snowpack (<strong><a href="https://youtu.be/BGMeTxj_YcU">video</a></strong>, <strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/digging-pit-scotch-bonnet">photo</a></strong>). Eric was in Beehive last weekend and was cautiously optimistic about <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> (<strong><a href="https://youtu.be/u2sRTMjaIcI">video</a></strong>). These are a few data points within a large advisory area, and <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> can change over a short distance. Before committing to ride in avalanche terrain, dig to assess the snowpack on slopes similar to those you plan to ride for the day (<strong><a href="https://youtu.be/omz-G0veivc">video</a></strong>).</p> <p>Rain and above freezing temperatures are bad for <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a>, and are unusual weather for late November when there is already 3-5 feet of snow on the ground. Unusual weather creates unusual avalanches. If you get out to earn your turkey for Thanksgiving, be ready to adjust your plan to unexpected or changing conditions. Avoid avalanche terrain if there is more than a few inches of unconsolidated, wet snow on the surface, or if you see loose avalanches or pinwheels (<strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/photos/pcb.10155779158610030/10155779158480030/?type=3&amp;theater">photo</a></strong>).</p> <p>If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/node/add/snow_observation">website</a>, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>Nov. 28, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Play it Again Sports</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Dec. 6, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>Dec. 7, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Dec. 13, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6:30-8 p.m. at Gallatin Valley Snowmobile Association, 4-Corners</p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>WEST YELLOWSTONE</u></p> <p>Dec. 14 and 15, <strong>Snowmobiler Introduction to Avalanches with Field Course</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/25138"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-forecasters-choice-text field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Forecasters Choice Text</div> <div class="field__item"><p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt">Here’s a <a href="https://backcountryaccess.com/portfolio/intro-avalanche-transceivers-ski-snowboard-video/?utm_source=PRO+Ski+Newsletter+-+US+-+Nov+2017&amp;utm_campaign=US+PRO+Ski+Newsletter+-+November+2017&amp;utm_medium=email"><b><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">new video series</span></b></a> from BCA outlining how to use an avalanche transceiver to perform an effective rescue.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 22 Nov 2017 14:07:09 +0000 Alex Marienthal 17883 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Mon Nov 20, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/20 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Mon Nov 20, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/124" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Doug Chabot</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 11/20/2017 - 07:02</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="field field--name-field-audio-file field--type-file field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="audiofield"> <audio controls > <source src="https://www.mtavalanche.com/sites/default/files/audio/2017-Nov-20-06-57-30.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"> Your browser does not support the audio element. </audio> <label>2017-Nov-20-06-57-30.mp3</label> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Doug Chabot with early season weather and avalanche information from the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Monday, November 20<sup>th</sup> at 7:30 a.m. This information is sponsored by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/"><strong>The Friends of the Avalanche Center</strong></a> and <strong><a href="https://www.bozo.coop/" target="_blank">Community Food Co-op</a></strong>.<strong> </strong>We will update this bulletin on Wednesday and begin issuing daily avalanche advisories and <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/danger-ratings" title="In the U.S., a five-category estimation of the avalanche danger: Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">danger ratings</a> this Friday.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>There’s been no new snow since Friday night, just wind. Mountain temperatures this morning are in the mid-20s in the north and high teens in the south. Southwest winds picked up overnight and are blowing steady at 35 mph with gusts near 55 mph. As the day progresses skies will become cloudy and winds will decrease and shift northerly. Later today and tonight the mountains will get a little snow and possibly rain in the valleys. By morning I expect 1-2” in the north and 2-4” in the southern mountains. Tuesday looks to be dry and uneventful.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>My primary avalanche concern for the next couple days is fresh wind slabs cracking and avalanching. Skiers in the Bridger Range, up Hyalite, near Big Sky and on Ramshorn Peak in the southern Gallatin all reported winds blowing snow over the weekend (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/gusty-winds-hyalite">photo</a></strong>). A few wind slabs cracked as skiers slid by. Winds became strong and gusty last night further thickening wind slabs and increasing their chance of being triggered.</p> <p>In all our ranges, except Cooke City, there are a few slopes with weaker, <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/faceted-snow" title="Angular snow with poor bonding created from large temperature gradients within the snowpack." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">faceted snow</a> near the ground. Snowpacks thinner than 3’ deep at higher elevations are where this layer is prominent. Eric found it in Beehive Basin on Saturday, and although he could not get this layer to break in his <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> test, he is still cautious. His <strong><a href="https://youtu.be/u2sRTMjaIcI">video</a></strong>, titled “Could be Worse”, explains his concern and optimism. Yesterday at Big Sky Ski Area the patrol was able to <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/trigger" title="A disturbance that initiates fracture within the weak layer causing an avalanche. In 90 percent of avalanche accidents, the victim or someone in the victims party triggers the avalanche." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">trigger</a> avalanches with explosives at the ground on heavily wind-loaded slopes (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/big-sky-avalanche-control">photo</a></strong>). We pay close attention to early season avalanche control at ski areas since their snowpack resembles the backcountry. The avalanches at Big Sky are warnings that some slopes have weak, unstable snow.</p> <p>Outside Cooke City there is a 4-5’ deep snowpack that is mostly stable (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/mt-republic-profile">snowpit profile</a></strong>) with the exception being wind-loaded slopes. These mountains have lots of snow and recent wind. Wind-loaded slopes are the most dangerous and on Friday snowmobilers saw a natural avalanche cover their tracks on Mt. Abundance (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/debis-natural-avalanche-mt-abundance">photo</a></strong>).</p> <p>If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/node/add/snow_observation">website</a>, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>Nov. 28, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Play it Again Sports</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Dec. 6, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>Dec. 7, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Dec. 13, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6:30-8 p.m. at Gallatin Valley Snowmobile Association, 4-Corners</p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>WEST YELLOWSTONE</u></p> <p>Dec. 14 and 15, Snowmobiler Introduction to Avalanches with Field Course, <strong><a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/25138">Info and Register Here</a></strong></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-forecasters-choice-text field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Forecasters Choice Text</div> <div class="field__item"><p style="margin-bottom:.0001pt">Here’s a <b><a href="https://backcountryaccess.com/portfolio/intro-avalanche-transceivers-ski-snowboard-video/?utm_source=PRO+Ski+Newsletter+-+US+-+Nov+2017&amp;utm_campaign=US+PRO+Ski+Newsletter+-+November+2017&amp;utm_medium=email">new video series</a></b> from BCA outlining how to use an avalanche transceiver to perform an effective rescue.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 20 Nov 2017 14:02:11 +0000 Doug Chabot 17875 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Sat Nov 18, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/18 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Sat Nov 18, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1183" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alex Marienthal</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 11/18/2017 - 06:22</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Alex Marienthal with early season weather and avalanche information from the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Saturday, November 18<sup>th</sup> at 6:30 a.m. This bulletin is sponsored by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/"><strong>The Friends of the Avalanche Center</strong></a> and <strong><a href="http://www.sparkrandd.com/">Spark R&amp;D</a></strong>.<strong> </strong>We will update this bulletin when conditions change. The GNFAC will begin issuing daily advisories on Friday, November 24<sup>th</sup>.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>The mountains got 1-2” of snow as the storm ended yesterday. Wind has been out of the west-southwest at 15-30 mph with gusts to 40 mph. Temperatures this morning are single digits to teens F and will rise to high 20s F today. Skies will be partly cloudy with moderate to strong southwest wind at 15-30 mph. There is no new snow expected through the weekend and a chance for a small storm Monday night.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" ><a href="/advisory/southern-madison" class="advisory-region" style="color: #fafafa;">Southern Madison</a></h3><h3 class ="region" ><a href="/advisory/southern-gallatin" class="advisory-region" style="color: #fafafa;">Southern Gallatin</a></h3><h3 class ="region" ><a href="/advisory/bridgers" class="advisory-region" style="color: #fafafa;">Lionhead Range</a></h3><h3 class ="region" ><a href="/advisory/cooke-city" class="advisory-region" style="color: #fafafa;">Cooke City</a></h3></div><p>The storm that ended yesterday morning left 1-2 feet of dense snow in the mountains around Cooke City and West Yellowstone. This new snow was equal to 1.5 to 2” of SWE (<a href="https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/or/snow/?cid=nrcs142p2_046155">snow water equivalent</a>) and was accompanied by strong west to southwest winds. This rapid, heavy load created very unstable conditions. Snowmobilers near Cooke City witnessed a natural avalanche on the east side of Mt. Abundance that covered their tracks from earlier in the day (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/debis-natural-avalanche-mt-abundance">photo</a></strong>). Strong wind last night continued to load slopes, and today avalanches will remain easy to <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/trigger" title="A disturbance that initiates fracture within the weak layer causing an avalanche. In 90 percent of avalanche accidents, the victim or someone in the victims party triggers the avalanche." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">trigger</a> or could run naturally. Carefully evaluate terrain and avoid traveling on or underneath large, steep slopes.</p><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" ><a href="/advisory/bridgers" class="advisory-region" style="color: #fafafa;">Bridger Range</a></h3><h3 class ="region" ><a href="/advisory/northern-gallatin" class="advisory-region" style="color: #fafafa;">Northern Gallatin</a></h3><h3 class ="region" ><a href="/advisory/northern-madison" class="advisory-region" style="color: #fafafa;">Northern Madison</a></h3></div><p>The 2-4” of new snow in the mountains near Bozeman and Big Sky does not create as much instability as the 1-2 feet in the southern ranges. However, strong west-southwest wind drifted recent snow into wind slabs and large cornices (<strong><a href="https://youtu.be/omBKbUoTHDc">video</a></strong>, <strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/cornices-hyalite">photo</a></strong>). Fresh wind slabs and cornices are mostly confined to ridgelines (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/big-cornices-hyalite">photo</a></strong>, <strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/wind-slab-northern-bridgers">photo</a></strong>), and will be possible to <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/trigger" title="A disturbance that initiates fracture within the weak layer causing an avalanche. In 90 percent of avalanche accidents, the victim or someone in the victims party triggers the avalanche." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">trigger</a> this weekend. The best strategy is to travel on non-wind loaded slopes, and stay far back from the edge of cornices while travelling along ridgelines.</p> <p>On non-wind loaded slopes, snow from November has bonded mostly well to the older snow. Avalanches breaking on deeper layers are still possible, as Eric and I found earlier this week in the northern Bridgers (<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omz-G0veivc&amp;list=PLXu5151nmAvQSYtIfyQP-gMYrlfja6Ls_"><strong>video</strong></a><strong>, </strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/unstable-ect-results-n-bridgers"><strong>photo</strong></a>), and as shown by a large natural avalanche near Cooke City last week (<a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/crown-butte-avalanche"><strong>photo</strong></a>). Many slopes are stable while some are not. Dig a <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/snowpit" title="A pit dug vertically into the snowpack where snow layering is observed and stability tests may be performed. Also called a snow profile." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">snowpit</a> and do a <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> test to assess the relationship between all layers in the snowpack before traveling in steep terrain.</p> <p>We are still collecting snowpack data from around the advisory area and will being issuing <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/danger-ratings" title="In the U.S., a five-category estimation of the avalanche danger: Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">danger ratings</a> when we start daily advisories a week from today.</p> <p>If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/node/add/snow_observation">website</a>, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Get Avalanche Smart – Episode 2: Don’t Be Like Dick</h3> <p>The Friends of the Avalanche Center present the second of 4 short films promoting avalanche education. Dick Aspen and Doug Chabot star in this episode to encourage you to “get the real forecast” <a href="https://youtu.be/oc9YtBTdc2c"><strong>VIDEO</strong></a>.</p> <h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p><strong>TONIGHT!!!</strong> November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice for Snowmobiles</strong>, 9 a.m. at Montana Boat Center, Helena</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>6 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-forecasters-choice-text field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Forecasters Choice Text</div> <div class="field__item"><p>The best $30 you’ll ever spend, guaranteed: Our<strong><em> Intro to Avalanches with Field Day</em></strong>. Two evenings of lectures plus a full day in the field digging pits and learning about rescue. <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Sat, 18 Nov 2017 13:22:50 +0000 Alex Marienthal 17862 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Fri Nov 17, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/17 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Fri Nov 17, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/126" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Knoff</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 11/17/2017 - 06:01</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Eric Knoff with early season weather and avalanche information from the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Friday, November 17<sup>th</sup> at 6:00 a.m. This information is sponsored by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/"><strong>The Friends of the Avalanche Center</strong></a> and <a href="http://stateparks.mt.gov/"><strong>Montana State Parks</strong></a>.<strong> </strong>We will update this bulletin when conditions change. The GNFAC will begin issuing daily advisories on Friday, November 24<sup>th</sup>.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>Over the past 24 hours the mountains around West Yellowstone and Cooke City picked up over a foot of new snow. The mountains around Big Sky including the northern Gallatin Range squeezed out 2-3” while the Bridger Range remained mostly dry. At 5 a.m. temperatures range from the upper teens to mid-20’s F and winds are blowing 15-30 mph out of the W-SW. Today, skies will remain mostly cloudy and light snow showers will linger in the mountains south of Bozeman, although no real accumulation is expected. Highs will warm into the upper 20’s to low 30’s and winds will gradually decrease blowing 10-20 out of the W-SW. A weak ridge of high pressure builds over the area tonight and this weekend looks to be mostly dry.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>The current storm has heavily favored the mountains around West Yellowstone and Cooke City, which have picked up over a foot of high density snow totaling 1.5 to 2” of SWE (<a href="https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/or/snow/?cid=nrcs142p2_046155">snow water equivalent</a>). This rapid and heavy load will be applying significant stress to any weakness in the snowpack. Stress will be especially concentrated on wind loaded slopes, which will likely produce human triggered avalanches today. Natural avalanches will also be possible, so carefully evaluate terrain and avoid traveling underneath large, steep slopes.</p> <p>Winds have blown predominately out of the west-southwest, making slopes facing the east half of the compass most susceptible to heavy <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/wind-loading" title="The added weight of wind drifted snow." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">wind loading</a>. However, all slopes have the potential to hold wind drifted snow, especially at higher elevations. Obvious signs of instability such as cracking and collapsing are obvious clues the snowpack is unstable. Also, keep an eye out for large cornices along the ridgelines. These are key indicators heavy <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/wind-loading" title="The added weight of wind drifted snow." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">wind loading</a> has taking place. Yesterday, skiers up Beehive Basin near Big Sky observed a natural <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/cornice" title="A mass of snow deposited by the wind, often overhanging, and usually near a sharp terrain break such as a ridge. Cornices can break off unexpectedly and should be approached with caution." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">cornice</a> failure that triggered as small <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/slab" title="A relatively cohesive snowpack layer." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">slab</a> avalanche on the slope below (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/cornice-triggered-avalanche-beehive-basin-16-nov-17">photo</a></strong>). Today, I expect cornices and slopes below cornices to remain highly sensitive to human triggers.</p> <p>Outside of wind loaded slopes, the snowpack has a few lingering instabilities. The main concern is the interface between the old snow surface (Sept.- Oct. snow) and the 2-4’ that has fallen over the past few weeks. On Wednesday, Alex and I got multiple ECT’s to propagate on this interface at higher elevations in the northern Bridgers (<strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omz-G0veivc&amp;list=PLXu5151nmAvQSYtIfyQP-gMYrlfja6Ls_">video</a></strong>). A large natural avalanche outside of Cooke City a week ago is a good example of what’s possible when slides fail on layers deeper in the pack (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/crown-butte-avalanche">photo</a></strong>). This interface isn’t unstable on all slopes, so it’s worth digging a <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/snowpit" title="A pit dug vertically into the snowpack where snow layering is observed and stability tests may be performed. Also called a snow profile." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">snowpit</a> and doing a <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> test to assess the relationship between all layers in the snowpack.</p> <p>We are still collecting snowpack data from around the advisory area and will begin issuing <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/danger-ratings" title="In the U.S., a five-category estimation of the avalanche danger: Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">danger ratings</a> when we start daily advisories a week from today.</p> <p>If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/node/add/snow_observation">website</a>, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Get Avalanche Smart – Episode 2: Don’t Be Like Dick</h3> <p>The Friends of the Avalanche Center present the second of 4 short films promoting avalanche education. Dick Aspen and Doug Chabot star in this episode to encourage you to “get the real forecast” <a href="https://youtu.be/oc9YtBTdc2c"><strong>VIDEO</strong></a>.</p> <h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>BUTTE</u></p> <p><strong>Tonight!</strong> <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m., Butte, MT</p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>18 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice for Snowmobiles</strong>, 9 a.m. at Montana Boat Center, Helena</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>6 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p> <div> <hr /></div> <p>Forecasters’ Choice:</p> <p>The best $30 you’ll ever spend, guaranteed: Our<strong><em> Intro to Avalanches with Field Day</em></strong>. Two evenings of lectures plus a full day in the field digging pits and learning about rescue. <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p></div> </div> </div> Fri, 17 Nov 2017 13:01:20 +0000 Eric Knoff 17855 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Tue Nov 14, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/14 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Tue Nov 14, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/126" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Knoff</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 11/14/2017 - 11:14</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Eric Knoff with early season weather and avalanche information from the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Tuesday, November 14<sup>th</sup> at 11:30 a.m. This information is sponsored by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/"><strong>The Friends of the Avalanche Center</strong></a> and <strong><a href="http://www.grizzlyoutfitters.com/">Grizzly Outfitters</a></strong>.<strong> </strong>We will update snowpack and weather information this weekend. Daily advisories will start Friday, November 24th. </p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>Since 6 a.m. a fast moving storm dropped 4-6” of snow in the mountains around Bozeman and Big Sky and 2-3” in the mountains around West Yellowstone and Cooke City. Currently, snow has tapered off across the advisory area and no additional accumulation is expected. Temps have dropped 5-10° this morning and are currently in the low to mid 20s F. Winds are blowing 15-30 mph out of the west with gusts around Cooke City breaking 40 mph. Winds will decrease throughout the day as a weak ridge of high pressure builds over the area. Conditions will be dry today and tomorrow, but another storm is forecasted to impact the area Thursday and Friday.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>Flying back from east coast yesterday, I observed large plumes of snow tailing off the high peaks from the Beartooths to the Bridger Range. This was bull’s eye information that active <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/wind-loading" title="The added weight of wind drifted snow." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">wind loading</a> was taking place across the advisory area. A photo from Mt Blackmore yesterday highlights this problem perfectly (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/high-winds-mt-blackmore-13-nov-17">photo</a></strong>). Today, new and wind-blown snow from this morning will be resting over larger wind slabs that formed during the high winds prior to the storm. Slides initiating in the new snow could break into older wind slabs producing larger and more dangerous avalanches. Today, approach all wind loaded slopes with caution and remember that even small slides can have large consequences (<a href="https://youtu.be/4eBF2YWsDOc"><strong>video</strong></a>).</p> <p>A secondary problem will be avalanches failing on weak layers buried deeper in the pack. This problem is not widespread and is mostly confined to higher elevation slopes that held snow from earlier in the season. These weak layers will be under stress from new and wind-blown snow and could produce large, dangerous slides. A large natural avalanche that occurred three days ago on Crown Butte outside of Cooke City is a perfect example of this problem (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/crown-butte-avalanche">photo</a></strong>). Be extra cautious in steep, rocky terrain or on any slope that has been heavily wind loaded.</p> <p>It’s early season but the mountains already have 2-4 feet of snow on the ground. If you plan to ski, ride, hunt or climb in avalanche terrain, carry the proper rescue gear (shovel, beacon, <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/probe" title="A metal rod used to probe through avalanche debris for buried victims." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">probe</a>) and assess terrain and snowpack carefully (<a href="https://youtu.be/im0A8Wk-NsE"><strong>video</strong></a>).</p> <p>If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/node/add/snow_observation">website</a>, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Get Avalanche Smart – Episode 2: Don’t Be Like Dick</h3> <p>The Friends of the Avalanche Center present the second of 4 short films promoting avalanche education. Dick Aspen and Doug Chabot star in this episode to encourage you to “get the real forecast” <a href="https://youtu.be/oc9YtBTdc2c"><strong>VIDEO</strong></a>.</p> <h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>BUTTE</u></p> <p>17 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m., Butte, MT</p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>18 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice for Snowmobiles</strong>, 9 a.m. at Montana Boat Center, Helena</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>6 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p> <div> <hr /></div> <p>Forecasters’ Choice:</p> <p>The best $30 you’ll ever spend, guaranteed: Our<strong><em> Intro to Avalanches with Field Day</em></strong>. Two evenings of lectures plus a full day in the field digging pits and learning about rescue. <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p></div> </div> </div> Tue, 14 Nov 2017 18:14:06 +0000 Eric Knoff 17839 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Sat Nov 11, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/11 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Sat Nov 11, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1183" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alex Marienthal</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 11/11/2017 - 06:28</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Alex Marienthal with early season weather and avalanche information from the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Saturday, November 11<sup>th</sup> at 6:45 a.m. This information is sponsored by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/"><strong>The Friends of the Avalanche Center</strong></a> and <strong><a href="http://www.yellowstonearcticyamaha.com/">Yellowstone Arctic Yamaha and Yamaha Motor Corp</a></strong>.<strong> </strong>We will update this bulletin when conditions change.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>At 4 a.m. the Bridge Range has 6-8” of new snow, mountains near Big Sky have 3”, Hyalite has 1”, West Yellowstone 5”, and Cooke City 6”. Temperatures are in the 20s F and wind is out of the southwest at 10-20 mph. Snowfall will taper off this morning with 1-2” more possible. Temperatures will reach the low 30s F this afternoon under mostly sunny skies with westerly wind at 10-15 mph. The rest of the weekend will be dry with wind increasing to 20-30 mph Sunday afternoon. Monday evening into Tuesday looks like the next chance for snow.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>At this point, a fresh layer of snow this early in the season is no surprise. The mountains have 3-4 feet of snow near Bozeman and Cooke City, and 2-3 feet near Big Sky and West Yellowstone. People have been skiing, ice climbing and snowmobiling, and have observed and triggered avalanches.</p> <p>New snow last night and wind today create unstable conditions on wind-loaded slopes. Avoid avalanche terrain if you see obvious sign of instability like cracking, collapsing, and recent avalanches. I observed similar conditions at Bridger on Tuesday (<strong><a href="https://youtu.be/4TJFOP7D1y8">video</a></strong>), and Doug saw drifting in Hyalite yesterday (<strong><a href="https://youtu.be/4eBF2YWsDOc">video</a></strong>). On Tuesday, I easily triggered a small <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/wind-slab" title="A cohesive layer of snow formed when wind deposits snow onto leeward terrain. Wind slabs are often smooth and rounded and sometimes sound hollow. " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">wind slab</a> north of Bridger Bowl, intentionally from a safe spot. It was fairly small, but would have been inescapable, and ran through a narrow, steep, rocky chute. Avoid wind-loaded slopes, likely found near ridgelines, and assess steep terrain for consequences of even a small <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/slide" title="A mass of snow sliding, tumbling, or flowing down an inclined surface. Same as avalanche." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">slide</a>.</p> <p>Last night’s snow fell on weak layers and crusts that formed over the last couple days (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/surface-hoar-near-bridger-bowl">photo</a></strong>, <strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/surface-hoar-hyalite">photo</a></strong>). Dig down a couple feet to assess the <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> of the new snow before riding in steep terrain. If the new snow easily slides or collapses, avoid similar slopes. <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">Stability</a> has been generally good on non-wind loaded slopes. However, it is still early and data is limited. Near Cooke City, riders observed avalanches breaking deep in the snowpack (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/avalanche-crown-butte-0">photo</a></strong>), which shows deeper slides are possible on slopes that hold snow from September and October. If you plan to ski or ride in avalanche terrain, I suggest to dig multiple snowpits in similar terrain to where you plan to ride and assess the <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> of deeper layers (<strong><a href="https://youtu.be/im0A8Wk-NsE">video</a></strong>).</p> <p>We will begin issuing daily avalanche advisories and <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/danger-ratings" title="In the U.S., a five-category estimation of the avalanche danger: Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">danger ratings</a> when the mountains get more snow. Our field data is currently limited. Besides our own field days we rely on others to help us form a picture of what’s happening across our forecast area. If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/node/add/snow_observation">website</a>, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Get Avalanche Smart – Episode 2: Don’t Be Like Dick</h3> <p>The Friends of the Avalanche Center present the second of 4 short films promoting avalanche education. Dick Aspen and Doug Chabot star in this episode to encourage you to “get the real forecast” <strong><a href="https://youtu.be/oc9YtBTdc2c">VIDEO</a></strong>.</p> <h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>BUTTE</u></p> <p>17 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m., Butte, MT</p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>7 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Carroll College, Helena</p> <p>18 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice for Snowmobiles</strong>, 9 a.m. at Montana Boat Center, Helena</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>6 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p> <div> <hr /></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-forecasters-choice-text field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Forecasters Choice Text</div> <div class="field__item"><p>The best $30 you’ll ever spend, guaranteed: Our<b><i> Intro to Avalanches with Field Day</i></b>. Two evenings of lectures plus a full day in the field digging pits and learning about rescue. <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><b><span style="color:#0563c1">Info and Register Here</span></b></a></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Sat, 11 Nov 2017 13:28:06 +0000 Alex Marienthal 17825 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Mon Nov 6, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/06 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Mon Nov 6, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/124" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Doug Chabot</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 11/06/2017 - 05:58</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Doug Chabot with early season weather and avalanche information for the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Monday, November 6<sup>th</sup> at 6:30 a.m. This information is sponsored by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/"><strong>The Friends of the Avalanche Center</strong></a><strong> </strong>and <a href="https://www.bozo.coop"><strong>Community Food Co-op</strong></a>.<strong> </strong>We will update this bulletin when conditions change.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>In the last 24 hours the mountains around Cooke City recorded 4” of new snow with 1-3” falling everywhere else. At 5 a.m. it is still snowing lightly and ridgetop winds are blowing W-SW at 15-20 mph and gusting to 30 mph with temperatures in the upper teens. Another inch will fall this morning, then skies will clear and temperatures will drop tonight to below 0F. Through Wednesday, skies will be mostly clear and temperatures will fluctuate between zero at night and teens during the day with light westerly winds. A weak storm might bring snow flurries Thursday and Friday.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>It sure looks like winter out there! There’s 2-4 feet of snow in the mountains and people have been getting out skiing, including us. Reports from Cooke City, Hyalite and the Bridger Range are surprisingly similar: on slopes that have not been wind-loaded the <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> is mostly good. The snow structure is mostly “right-side up” which means less dense, powdery snow is sitting atop denser, supportable snow. These snowpits graphically show this stable structure (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/west-woody-ridge">snowpit1</a></strong>, <strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/bridger-pit-profile-3-nov">snowpit2</a></strong>).</p> <p>Wind-loaded slopes are not stable. Evidence of this instability are recent avalanches near Fairy Lake (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/natural-avalanche-near-fairy-lake">photo</a></strong>), Saddle Peak (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/saddle-peak-slide-5-november-17">photo</a></strong>) and Hyalite Peak. Even though wind speeds have not been strong, speeds of 15 mph are more than enough to blow and drift snow into unstable wind slabs.</p> <p>Alex, Eric and I have been in the Bridger and northern Gallatin Ranges the last three days and are in agreement that slopes untouched by the wind are generally stable, but those near the ridgetops are suspect (<strong><a href="https://youtu.be/fcRlhZKUlBQ">video</a></strong>). Wind will be the primary factor creating unstable conditions in the coming days.</p> <p>We will begin issuing daily avalanche advisories and <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/danger-ratings" title="In the U.S., a five-category estimation of the avalanche danger: Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">danger ratings</a> when the mountains get more snow. Our field data is currently limited. Besides our own field days we rely on others to help us form a picture of what’s happening across our forecast area. If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our <a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/node/add/snow_observation">website</a>, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Get Avalanche Smart – Growing Up</h3> <p>The Friends of the Avalanche Center present the first of 4 short films promoting avalanche education. Ben Goertzen explains why it is important to take an avalanche class. <a href="https://youtu.be/MtFmJYhWG58"><strong>VIDEO</strong></a>.</p> <h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>BILLINGS</u></p> <p>7 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Billings</p> <p><u>BUTTE</u></p> <p>17 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m., Butte, MT</p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>7 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Carroll College, Helena</p> <p>18 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice for Snowmobiles</strong>, 9 a.m. at Montana Boat Center, Helena</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>6 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-forecasters-choice-text field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Forecasters Choice Text</div> <div class="field__item"><p>The best $30 you’ll ever spend, guaranteed: Our Intro to Avalanches with Field Day. Two evenings of lectures plus a full day in the field digging pits and learning about rescue. <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613">https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613</a></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 06 Nov 2017 12:58:56 +0000 Doug Chabot 17789 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Sun Nov 5, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/05 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Sun Nov 5, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/124" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Doug Chabot</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 11/05/2017 - 06:34</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Doug Chabot with early season weather and avalanche information for the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Sunday, November 5<sup>th</sup> at 7:00 a.m. This bulletin is sponsored by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/"><strong>The Friends of the Avalanche Center</strong></a><strong> </strong>and <strong><a href="http://www.worldboards.com/">World Boards</a></strong>.<strong> </strong>We will update early season information as conditions change.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>Since yesterday morning an inch of new snow fell in the northern mountains, 6” around West Yellowstone and 10” outside Cooke City. Under partly cloudy skies mountain temperatures are in the upper teens and winds are southwest at 10-15 mph. Today will warm into the mid 20’s and clouds will increase with light W-SW winds. Snow is expected to fall later today and this evening bringing 3-5” in the southern mountains and 2-3” in the north. Dry, cold weather is forecasted Monday through Thursday with a possible shift back to snowy weather later in the week.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>Since Wednesday the mountains have received 2-3’ of new snow with Cooke City getting over 4’. At the lower elevations this fell onto dirt while up high there was already 1-2’ on the ground. Most field observations indicate that the snow has good <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a>, a nice treat for early November. The exception are slopes that have been wind-loaded near the ridgetops. Avalanches were seen on Thursday on Mt. Blackmore (<a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/natural-avalanches-mt-blackmore-nov-2"><strong>photo</strong></a>) and <strong>if winds increase, so will the avalanche danger</strong>.</p> <p>Skiers crawled all over the Bridger Range yesterday, mostly at Bridger Bowl. Eric and his partner joined the masses and observed, “We didn’t experience any cracking or collapsing and did not observe and recent activity. Overall <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> was better than expected. I would guess on Saddle or the northern Bridgers things could be different where the wind had more influence.” His <strong><a href="https://youtu.be/fcRlhZKUlBQ">video</a></strong> explains the layering in the snowpack. Skiers on Mt Blackmore in Hyalite found similar conditions and in both ranges the winds were light. Climbers in Hyalite wallowed in new, powder snow down to the rock (<strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/looking-ice-flanders">photo</a></strong>) and only encountered sluffing.</p> <p>It is early season and our understanding of the <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> is limited since our field data is scarce. Besides the typical early season hazards of rocks, tree stumps, and our own rusty skill sets, we still have to analyze snow <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> and travel as though it’s mid-winter (i.e. only expose one at a time, carry rescue gear, test for <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a>, etc.). There’s no shortcut to safety.</p> <div> <hr /></div> <p>If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our website, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#gnfacobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>Get Avalanche Smart – Growing Up</h3> <p>The Friends of the Avalanche Center present the first of 4 short films promoting avalanche education. Ben Goertzen explains why it is important to take an avalanche class. <strong><a href="https://youtu.be/MtFmJYhWG58">VIDEO</a></strong>.</p> <h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>Billings</u></p> <p>7 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Billings</p> <p><u>BUTTE</u></p> <p>17 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m., Butte, MT</p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>7 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Carroll College, Helena</p> <p>18 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice for Snowmobiles</strong>, 9 a.m. at Montana Boat Center, Helena</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>6 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p></div> </div> </div> Sun, 05 Nov 2017 13:34:14 +0000 Doug Chabot 17783 at https://www.mtavalanche.com GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Sat Nov 4, 2017 https://www.mtavalanche.com/advisory/17/11/04 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">GNFAC Avalanche Advisory for Sat Nov 4, 2017</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/126" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Eric Knoff</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 11/04/2017 - 06:24</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-intro field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Good morning. This is Eric Knoff with early season weather and avalanche information for the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center on Saturday, November 4<sup>th</sup> at 7:30 a.m. This bulletin is sponsored by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/friendsgnfac/"><strong>The Friends of the Avalanche Center</strong></a><strong> </strong>and <a href="http://www.mysteryranch.com/"><strong>Mystery Ranch</strong></a><strong>. </strong>We will update early season information as conditions warrant.</p></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-weather field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Mountain Weather</div> <div class="field__item"><p>A strong winter storm has delivered heavy snow to southwest Montana. Since yesterday morning the Bridger Range has received 8-10” of new snow totaling roughly 1” of SWE. The northern Gallatin and northern Madison Ranges picked up 5-8” of new snow totaling .5” of SWE, while the mountains around West Yellowstone and Cooke City received 6-8” of dense snow totaling 1 to 1.4” of SWE. This morning it’s still snowing lightly and temperatures range from the upper teens to mid-20s F. Winds are blowing 10-20 mph out of the W-SW with gusts around Big Sky breaking 30 mph. Today, light snow will continue with an additional 1-3” possible. Highs will warm into the 20s to low 30s F and winds will continue to blow 10-20 mph out of the W-SW. Snow tapers off this afternoon and no major accumulation is expected tonight into tomorrow morning.</p> <div class="full-weather-wrapper "><ul class="full-weather button-list"><li><a href="/weather/wx-avalanche-log">Weather and Avalanche Log</a></li></ul></div></div> </div> <div class="discussion"><div class="field__label">Snowpack and Avalanche Discussion</div><div class = "region-group" > <div class = "region hazard-rating-image" ><a href ="#" title = "None Avalanche Hazard" alt ="None Avalanche Hazard"><img src ="/images/hazard_ratings/simple/None.png" class = "hazard-image-main" /></a><br /></div><h3 class ="region" >All Regions</h3></div><p>The equation is fairly simple today – lots of new snow combined with moderate to strong winds out of the west-southwest will significantly increase the avalanche hazard. Wind loaded slopes will be the most prone to producing natural and human triggered slides, but non-wind loaded slopes also pose a threat. On Thursday, skiers on Mt Blackmore in the northern Gallatin Range observed natural avalanches in steep, rocky terrain. These slides appeared to be the result of heavy <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/wind-loading" title="The added weight of wind drifted snow." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">wind loading</a> <strong>(<a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/natural-avalanches-mt-blackmore-nov-2">photo</a></strong>, <strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/crown-lines-mt-blackmore-nov-2">photo</a></strong>). Today I expect both natural and human triggered avalanches to occur on similar slopes.</p> <p>Despite heavy snow over the past few days, snow coverage and structure remains highly variable. On sun exposed slopes and lower elevation terrain, 1-2 feet of new snow is sitting on mostly bare ground. In these areas coverage is thin and the likelihood of triggering a larger <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/slab" title="A relatively cohesive snowpack layer." class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">slab</a> avalanche is less likely. In higher elevation terrain, new snow is sitting over a variety of old snow surfaces. On some slopes, mainly those facing the north half of the compass, the new snow is poorly bonded to the old snow surface and has produced unstable results in <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> tests (<a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/clean-break-under-new-snow"><strong>photo</strong></a><strong>, </strong><a href="https://www.mtavalanche.com/images/17/snow-pit-near-cooke"><strong>photo</strong></a><strong>, </strong><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfCdHe8cqu0&amp;list=PLXu5151nmAvQSYtIfyQP-gMYrlfja6Ls_&amp;index=2"><strong>video</strong></a>). On other aspects, the new snow is well bonded to the old snow surface and <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> is better.</p> <p>Yesterday, Alex and his partner toured up Bridger Bowl and found relatively good <a href="https://staging.avalanche.org/avalanche-education/stability" title="The chance that an avalanche will not occur, relative to a given trigger (usually the weight of a human). " class="taxonomy-tooltip-link" target="_blank">stability</a> near the top of the Bridger Lift. That story will likely be different today with another 8-10 inches of new snow overnight. <strong>The bottom is </strong>– all the necessary ingredients for avalanches exist in the mountains. Take the necessary time to <a>assess each slope carefully before hiking up or skiing down and pay attention to the terrain above and below you. It will likely be busy in the backcountry, especially around Bridger Bowl, so use good protocol when traveling around other people.</a></p> <div> <hr /></div> <p>If you get out and have any avalanche or snowpack observations to share, drop a line via our website, email (<a href="mailto:mtavalanche@gmail.com">mtavalanche@gmail.com</a>), phone (406-587-6984), or Instagram (#GNFACobs).</p><div><ul class="button-list"><li><a href="/node/add/snow_observation">Submit Snow Observations</a></li></ul></div></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3>New Avalanche Education Video</h3> <p>Check it out! The Friends of the Avalanche Center present the first of 4 short films promoting avalanche education. Ben Goertzen explains why it’s important to get avalanche education. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MtFmJYhWG58">VIDEO</a></p> <h3>Upcoming Avalanche Education and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://www.mtavalanche.com/workshops/calendar"><strong>Events and Education Calendar</strong></a></p> <p><u>Billings</u></p> <p>7 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Billings</p> <p><u>BUTTE</u></p> <p>17 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m., Butte, MT</p> <p><u>HELENA</u></p> <p>7 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Carroll College, Helena</p> <p>18 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice for Snowmobiles</strong>, 9 a.m. at Montana Boat Center, Helena</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at Basecamp, Helena</p> <p><u>BOZEMAN</u></p> <p>1 November, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>6 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness</strong>, 6-7:30 p.m. at REI Bozeman</p> <p>7 December, <strong>Avalanche Awareness and Beacon Practice</strong>, 6-8 p.m. at Beall Park, Bozeman</p> <p>Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 2, 3 or 9, <strong>Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24613"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 12 and 13, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24616"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 17, 18 and 20 or 21,<strong> Introduction to Avalanches w/ Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24614"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Jan. 24, 25 and 27, <strong>Advanced Avalanche Workshop w. Field Day</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24615"><strong>Info and Register Here</strong></a></p> <p>Feb. 9 and 10, <strong>Companion Rescue Clinic</strong>, <a href="https://events.ticketprinting.com/event/24617"><strong>Info and Register</strong></a></p> <p><u>COOKE CITY</u></p> <p>24 and 25 November, <strong>Current Conditions and Avalanche Rescue</strong>, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Friday and anytime between 10-2 on Saturday.</p></div> </div> </div> Sat, 04 Nov 2017 12:24:18 +0000 Eric Knoff 17779 at https://www.mtavalanche.com