Regional Conditions for Northern Gallatin

as of 5:00 am
Today0″ | 5-25 E
Mar 21 0″ | 10-15 SE
Mar 20 0″ | 10-15 E
9980′     03/22 at 05:00
27.1℉
E - 10mph
Gusts 20mph
8100′   03/22 at 5:00
29℉
68″ Depth
Bottom Line: Daytime warming and weak refreezes at night are taking a toll on the snowpack. Today, point release avalanches will be easy to trigger or could run naturally as the day warms. Wet slab avalanches are also a concern in steep rocky terrain or on slopes where the snowpack is less than 3-4 feet deep. The easiest way to manage the avalanche danger today is to start early and end early. The snowpack will be locked up this morning, but grow increasingly unstable as the day progresses.

Past 5 Days

Mon Mar 18

Low
Tue Mar 19

Low
Wed Mar 20

Moderate
Thu Mar 21

Considerable
Today

Moderate

Avalanche Activity- Northern Gallatin

Northern Gallatin
Mt Blackmore
Dry Slab, Loose Wet in Hyalite
Incident details include images
Mt Blackmore
HS-NC-R1-D2-G
Elevation: 10,000
Aspect: N
Coordinates: 45.4433, -111.0030
Caught: 0 ; Buried: 0; Killed: 0

A skier reported one natural dry slab avalanche that was triggered by a falling cornice and failed near the ground on the north face of Mt. Blackmore. She also saw multiple loose wet slides on solar aspects in the same area.


More Avalanche Details
Bridger Range
Fairy Lake
Wet loose slides Bridgers and Big Sky
Incident details include images
Fairy Lake
WL-N-R1-D1-S
Elevation: 8,900
Aspect: S
Caught: 0 ; Buried: 0

We saw natural and skier triggered wet loose avalanches near Fairy Lake. Big Sky Ski Patrol saw a few small natural wet loose slides in closed terrain.


More Avalanche Details
Northern Gallatin
Mt Blackmore
Dry loose slides in Hyalite
Incident details include images
Mt Blackmore
L-ASc-R1-D1-I
Elevation: 9,800
Aspect: E
Coordinates: 45.4446, -111.0020
Caught: 0 ; Buried: 0

Dry loose avalanches were easily triggered on steep terrain in Hyalite. Six inches of recent snow easily slid on crusts buried below it, and was drifted into small wind slabs near ridgelines. These types of small slides are typically not large enough to bury a person, but are dangerous if they catch and carry you over cliffs or into trees.


More Avalanche Details

Photos- Northern Gallatin

Displaying 1 - 40 of 4.61168601843E+18
  • A skier sent in photos of multiple loose wet avalanches near Mt. Blackmore yesterday. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • Recent dry slab avalanche that was triggered by a falling cornice and failed at the ground. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • Outside Cooke City up Zimmer Creek, a skier spotted this cornice fall which triggered a small pocket down low. Photo: F. Madsen

  • Many wet loose and wet slab avalanches were seen near Zimmer Creek (north of Cooke City) on south and east aspects. Temperatures were warm at 10,000 feet. Photo: F. Madsen

  • This photo near Lionhead, is indicative of the wet loose avalanches we are seeing on many low elevation, south facing slopes throughout our advisory area. Daytime temperatures near 50F will make avalanches like this more frequent and widespread in the coming days.

  • Low angle metal roofs have heavy, thick slabs of snow that built up during persistent cold temperatures. These slabs will slide during warm temperatures. Be on the lookout for overhead hazard and be cautious where you walk or park your car during warm sunny days. An additional urban hazard are large icicles are that will break during warm days. Photo: A. Schauer

  • On Friday (3/15) dry loose avalanches were easily triggered on steep terrain in Hyalite. Six inches of recent snow easily slid on crusts buried below it, and was drifted into small wind slabs near ridgelines. These types of small slides are typically not large enough to bury a person, but are dangerous if they catch and carry you over cliffs or into trees. Photo: GNFAC

  • This dry loose avalanche was intentionally triggered by a skier in Hyalite. Although generally small, dry loose avalanches can generate enough force to push skiers or riders into rocks or trees. Photo: C. Kussmaul 

  • A snowmobiler saw this recent activity on Saturday 3/9/19 on Cedar Mountain near Big Sky.

  • This slide was triggered on a steep (40 deg) southeast facing slope at Round Lake outside Cooke City. It failed 8" deep on a layer of graupel and small facets. An adjacent hill slid at the same depth beforehand. This layer is not on most slopes, but as this slide shows it is on some. Doug was in the area and dug a pit in the crown soon after it was triggered. Photo: J. Fritz

  • This slide on the NE face of Blackmore was triggered by the second skier. It was 8-12" deep and 100' wide and likely failed on small faceted crystals underneath the new snow. No one was caught. Going one at a time was good travel behavior that can save our lives when things go wrong.

  • A natural avalanche that broke within the new snow on the east face of Mount Blackmore. Photo: G. Antonioli.

  • Small skier triggered slide in the new snow on Mount Blackmore. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • From e-mail: "Observed a small slide that appeared to be skier-triggered (tracks entering & exiting) on a wind-loaded, north-facing (21 degrees north) slope, slope angle of approximately 36 degrees." Photo: A. Yount

  • This crown was observed on 3/3 and likely slid a couple days earlier after steady snowfall and wind. This path had a large avalanche previously this winter in mid-January. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • This crown was observed on 3/3 and likely slid a couple days earlier after steady snowfall and wind. This is the second time this slopes slid this winter.It had a large avalanche in mid-January. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • Steady snowfall last week created soft slabs like this natural crown. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • Cornices are large, and intense spring sun will make them weak and easier to trigger or break naturally. Be cautious along ridgelines and on slopes below these monsters as temperatures warm. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • Loose snow slides are possible on sunny slopes during intense spring sunshine. Recent snow is unconsolidated and it may be easy to trigger loose slides on some steep slopes. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • A skier found reactive wind slabs on the north face of Elephant today. Photo: W. Moore

  • Skiers reported triggering soft wind slabs in Hyalite on NE aspect at 9000'. Photo: T. Chingas

  • From an email, "Lots of wind slab activity... tough to tell exactly what happened here with everything filling back in so fast. A few quickly-disappearing crowns on ridge line and throughout E face, good debris pile." Photo: Cody C.

  • Photo: A. Lussier

  • A skier wrote, "Large natural avalanche on the south face of peak 10,201. Looked to be a day or two old and the crown looked to be 3-4 feet deep in places." Photo: S. Wilson

  • A skier noted, "Newish slide with a fresh looking debris pile. Between Alex Lowe and Peak 9806. Appeared to step down into the old snow. Looked like a D2.5-R3, natural trigger." Photo: F. Madsen

  • Natural avalanche observed on January 28th.

    From email: "Fresh natural on east face of Blackmore in gently wind-loaded terrain."

    Photo: B. VandenBos

  • Skiers triggered this avalanche in dense trees while ascending Mt. Ellis. From the email: "While subsequently skiing up through dense trees climbing to the north to attempt to reach the mid section of the going-home chute, a medium-size bowl-shaped opening in the trees released a soft slab just as we were entering the opening. The crown was ~24” deep and ~80-100’ across. Total snow depth in that area was less than three feet. The avalanche ran probably 500 vertical feet down a shallow gully. Neither my partner nor I where caught but way too close for comfort"

  • Skiers triggered this avalanche in dense trees while ascending Mt. Ellis. From the email: "While subsequently skiing up through dense trees climbing to the north to attempt to reach the mid section of the going-home chute, a medium-size bowl-shaped opening in the trees released a soft slab just as we were entering the opening. The crown was ~24” deep and ~80-100’ across. Total snow depth in that area was less than three feet. The avalanche ran probably 500 vertical feet down a shallow gully. Neither my partner nor I where caught but way too close for comfort." 

  • Skiers triggered this avalanche in dense trees while ascending Mt. Ellis. From the email: "While subsequently skiing up through dense trees climbing to the north to attempt to reach the mid section of the going-home chute, a medium-size bowl-shaped opening in the trees released a soft slab just as we were entering the opening. The crown was ~24” deep and ~80-100’ across. Total snow depth in that area was less than three feet. The avalanche ran probably 500 vertical feet down a shallow gully. Neither my partner nor I where caught but way too close for comfort."

  • A skier in Hyalite reported widespread avalanche activity in the Divide drainage. From the email: "Saw this set of crowns just to the looker's left of Divide Peak proper.  Appear to be cornice triggered, I suspect they all released sympathetically, maybe sometime yesterday.  Impressively connected, definite PWL issue. SE aspect. Crowns spanned nearly 1/2 mile of terrain." Photo: B. VandenBos

  • A skier in Hyalite reported widespread avalanche activity in the Divide drainage. From the email: "Saw this set of crowns just to the looker's left of Divide Peak proper.  Appear to be cornice triggered, I suspect they all released sympathetically, maybe sometime yesterday.  Impressively connected, definite PWL issue. SE aspect. Crowns spanned nearly 1/2 mile of terrain." Photo: B. VandenBos

  • A skier in Hyalite reported widespread avalanche activity in the Divide drainage. From the email: "Saw this set of crowns just to the looker's left of Divide Peak proper.  Appear to be cornice triggered, I suspect they all released sympathetically, maybe sometime yesterday.  Impressively connected, definite PWL issue. SE aspect. Crowns spanned nearly 1/2 mile of terrain." Photo: B. VandenBos

  • This avalanche on Wheeler Mountain failed right next to one that occurred on the same slope earlier in the week. Photo: G. Antonioli

  • Skiers near lick creek intentionally triggered this avalanche that failed below the recent snow. From the email: "Ski cut a wind loaded soft slab on 34 degree headwall dropping into Bozeman Cr. drainage. Slope fractured and ran short ways, 100 feet from crown to toe. Crown was 75 feet across and 20 inches deep." Photo: Kenna

  • Skiers near lick creek intentionally triggered this avalanche that failed below the recent snow. From the email: "Ski cut a wind loaded soft slab on 34 degree headwall dropping into Bozeman Cr. drainage. Slope fractured and ran short ways, 100 feet from crown to toe. Crown was 75 feet across and 20 inches deep." Photo: Kenna

  • Crown of avalanche that was triggered by a group of four skiers. Two were partially buried (1 injured, 1 killed) on 1/25/19. They were all ascending and near the top of the path when the avalanche broke. The top two skiers held onto trees as the avalanche pushed by them. Photo: GNFAC

  • Overview of avalanche path where a group of four skiers were caught, and two were partially buried (1 injured, 1 killed) on 1/25/19. Crown is marked by black line and location of partial burial/deceased is tip of red arrow. The other partially buried skier was 200' lower. They were all ascending and near the top of the path when the avalanche broke. The top two skiers held onto trees as the avalanche pushed by them. Photo: GNFAC

  • Skiers up the main fork of Hyalite Canyon experienced collapsing and shooting cracks on an east facing slope at 7.300 ft. Photo: M. Tepfer

  • A skier noticed multiple collapses at History Rock, and snapped a photo of active wind loading at higher elevations in Hyalite. From the email: " Roughly 30cm new snow from the last storm, light winds, although Blackmore (pictured) and Flanders appeared to be getting hammered by the wind. Did a few laps in the top meadow and was getting frequent collapsing on the way back up. One felt like a small earthquake and was the loudest wumpf I've ever heard." Photo: M. Lavery  

Videos- Northern Gallatin

Weather Forecast Northern Gallatin

Extended Forecast for

14 Miles SE Gallatin Gateway MT

  • Today

    Today: A 20 percent chance of snow after noon.  Mostly sunny, with a high near 43. Southwest wind 8 to 14 mph, with gusts as high as 18 mph.

    Mostly Sunny
    then Slight
    Chance Snow

    High: 43 °F

  • Tonight

    Tonight: A slight chance of snow before 7pm, then a chance of snow after midnight.  Mostly cloudy, with a low around 27. South wind 10 to 13 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 40%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

    Chance Snow

    Low: 27 °F

  • Saturday

    Saturday: A 50 percent chance of snow.  Partly sunny, with a high near 38. Southwest wind 9 to 11 mph becoming northwest in the afternoon.  New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

    Chance Snow

    High: 38 °F

  • Saturday
    Night

    Saturday Night: A 40 percent chance of snow.  Mostly cloudy, with a low around 27. Northwest wind 6 to 10 mph becoming south after midnight.  New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

    Chance Snow

    Low: 27 °F

  • Sunday

    Sunday: Snow, mainly after noon.  High near 35. South wind 6 to 11 mph becoming north in the morning.  Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

    Chance Snow
    then Snow

    High: 35 °F

  • Sunday
    Night

    Sunday Night: Snow likely, mainly before midnight.  Mostly cloudy, with a low around 27. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

    Snow Likely
    then Chance
    Snow

    Low: 27 °F

  • Monday

    Monday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 34.

    Mostly Sunny

    High: 34 °F

  • Monday
    Night

    Monday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 27.

    Mostly Cloudy

    Low: 27 °F

  • Tuesday

    Tuesday: A slight chance of snow.  Partly sunny, with a high near 37.

    Slight Chance
    Snow

    High: 37 °F

The Last Word

Spring is here and wet snow avalanches are becoming a daily concern. Anticipate decreasing stability while forming a travel plan. This article from Backcountry Magazine highlights some things look for that indicate when it is time to turn around.


  <<  This is the most recent forecast.