Trip Planning for Northern Madison

as of 5:00 am
Today0″ | 10-25 SW
Apr 23 0″ | 4-6 NE
Apr 22 0″ | 10-45 W
9400′     4/24 at 18:00
47 ℉
SW - 6 mph, Gusts 16
-6999 " New
8880′     04/24 at 16:00
50℉
39″ Depth
Primary Problem: Wet Snow
Bottom Line: Warm temperatures, wind-loading, and the possibility of rain and snow later in the week will drive avalanche problems. Wet snow avalanches will be the primary concern on most slopes. Get on to the snow early in the day when surface-level crusts are supportable and get off when the crust breaks down and more than the upper few inches of snow become slushy and wet. Relatively small wind-slab avalanches are possible on upper-elevation slopes that remain shady and cool. If the upper snowpack is dry, dig down and back off steep objectives if you find instability in your tests, observe shooting cracks or indications of fresh wind-loading. Reevaluate conditions when a mix of rain and snow moves into the area on Thursday and Friday.

Past 5 Days

Sat Apr 13

Considerable
Sun Apr 14

Considerable
Mon Apr 15

None
Fri Apr 19

None
Mon Apr 22

None

Relevant Avalanche Activity

Northern Madison
Beehive Basin
Loose Snow avalanches in Beehive and Bear Basins
Beehive Basin
L-AS
Coordinates: 45.3477, -111.3890
Caught: 0 ; Buried: 0

From obs: "We saw several loose avalanches on WSW, ESE & SSE aspects of the ridge between beehive and bear basin.  The one on the ESE slope may have been skier triggered (by another group) and the rest appeared to be natural.  We found a strong crust beneath the foot of new snow throughout our route.  We didn't see any cracks or whumphs, and the new snow wasn't reactive in hand pits.  The snow surface was getting wet as we exited to the beehive trailhead around 3pm."


More Avalanche Details
Southern Madison
Quake Lake
Wet Slab Avalanche Above Quake Lake
Incident details include images
Quake Lake
WS-N-R2-D2-G
Coordinates: 44.8524, -111.3920
Caught: 0 ; Buried: 0

From IG: Wet slide to the ground above Quake Lake. 


More Avalanche Details
Southern Madison
Sphinx Mountain
Cornice Collapse on the Sphinx
Incident details include images
Sphinx Mountain
C-ASu
Coordinates: 45.1582, -111.4770
Caught: 0 ; Buried: 0

From obs: " Unintentionally triggered a large cornice collapse on the south face of the Sphinx. " 


More Avalanche Details

Relevant Photos

Displaying 1 - 40
  • A group remotely triggered a wet slab avalanche from the ridge top. There were shooting cracks that connected their location to the avalanche. This is an interesting of persistent weak layer and wet snow avalanche problems. Photo: M Harry 

  • A group remotely triggered a wet slab avalanche from the ridge top. There were shooting cracks that connected their location to the avalanche. This is an interesting of persistent weak layer and wet snow avalanche problems. Photo: M Harry 

  • Observed on 04/05/2024: "Photo of recent loose wet avalanches that likely happened 24-48 hours ago on SW-W aspect at ~9800'" Photo: Z. Peterson

  • Observed on 04/05/2024: "Photo of recent loose wet avalanches that likely happened 24-48 hours ago on SW-W aspect at ~9800'" Photo: Z. Peterson

  • On a small test slope near Muddy Creek we intentionally triggered several small avalanches in wind-loaded terrain by knocking chunks of cornice off. Photo: GNFAC

  • While riding we saw cracking forming near our sleds in fresh drifts: Photo: GNFAC

  • Strong wind transporting snow at ridge tops. Photo: GNFAC

  • We saw this recent avalanche near the Bear Creek wilderness boundary while riding on 03/24/2024. Photo: GNFAC

  • We saw this natural avalanche on a wind-loaded slope behind McAtee Basin. Photo: GNFAC

  • A rider triggered this avalanche in Taylor Fork on 3/16/24. "Avalanche broke about 400ft wide and slid for 250 ft. 4-2ft deep at the crown."

  • Skiers saw a natural avalanche on east-facing terrain at 9500' in Beehive Basin. Photo: Anonymous 

  • Skiers triggered this slope by dropping a section of cornice onto the slope. This avalanche broke 500' wide, and ranged in depth from 18" or 6'. Photo: P. Hess

  • Skiers triggered this slope by dropping a section of cornice onto the slope. This avalanche broke 500' wide, and ranged in depth from 18" or 6'. Photo: P. Hess

  • Skiers triggered this slope by dropping a section of cornice onto the slope. This avalanche broke 500' wide, and ranged in depth from 18" or 6'. Photo: P. Hess

  • Skiers triggered this slope by dropping a section of cornice onto the slope. This avalanche broke 500' wide, and ranged in depth from 18" or 6'. Photo: P. Hess

     

  • From obs: "On a tour up Middle Peak, I saw recent avalanches, with large propagation in Middle Basin and Beehive Basin." Photo Anonymous 

  • From obs: "On a tour up Middle Peak, I saw recent avalanches, with large propagation in Middle Basin and Beehive Basin." Photo Anonymous 

  • From IG: "Buck ridge south of slatts hill, remote trigger by a snowmobile today"

  • Skiers in Beehive Basin saw a natural avalanche on an east-facing slope. This avalanche likely happened in the last 24-48 hours. Photo: E. Heiman

  • Skiers intentionally triggered a small avalanche near the prayer flags in Bear Basin. This slope has avalanched previously this season. Photo: J Alford

  • Riders triggered this pair of avalanches while crossing below this terrain, roughly 150 yards away. The location of the triggers is marked by the "x's" in the photo. Photo: M. Rolfson 

  • Riders triggered this pair of avalanches while crossing below this terrain, roughly 150 yards away. Photo: M. Rolfson 

  • Rider on 02/23/2024 observed this large avalanche next to another avalanche they had triggered remotely. They likely triggered this one as well from afar while cross terrain below. Photo: M. Rolfson

  • Riders on 02/23/2024 triggered this avalanche from 150 yards away while traversing below. Photo: M. Rolfson

  • Riders on 02/23/2024 triggered this avalanche from 150 yards away while traversing below. Photo: M. Rolfson

     

  • On 2/18/24 near Buck Ridge and Muddy Creek we saw at least eight recent avalanches that occurred at various times over the last 1-3 days, natural and/or remote triggered by riders. A group in the parking lot mentioned seeing many slides actively happen in this area on Friday 2/16. Most were 2-3' deep hard slabs, ranging from 50'-500' wide. Photo: GNFAC

  • On 2/18/24 near Buck Ridge and Muddy Creek we saw at least eight recent avalanches that occurred at various times over the last 1-3 days, natural and/or remote triggered by riders. A group in the parking lot mentioned seeing many slides actively happen in this area on Friday 2/16. Most were 2-3' deep hard slabs, ranging from 50'-500' wide. Photo: GNFAC

  • On 2/18/24 near Buck Ridge and Muddy Creek we saw at least eight recent avalanches that occurred at various times over the last 1-3 days, natural and/or remote triggered by riders. A group in the parking lot mentioned seeing many slides actively happen in this area on Friday 2/16. Most were 2-3' deep hard slabs, ranging from 50'-500' wide. Photo: GNFAC

  • On 2/18/24 near Buck Ridge and Muddy Creek we saw at least eight recent avalanches that occurred at various times over the last 1-3 days, natural and/or remote triggered by riders. A group in the parking lot mentioned seeing many slides actively happen in this area on Friday 2/16. Most were 2-3' deep hard slabs, ranging from 50'-500' wide. Photo: GNFAC

  • On 2/18/24 near Buck Ridge and Muddy Creek we saw at least eight recent avalanches that occurred at various times over the last 1-3 days, natural and/or remote triggered by riders. A group in the parking lot mentioned seeing many slides actively happen in this area on Friday 2/16. Most were 2-3' deep hard slabs, ranging from 50'-500' wide. Photo: GNFAC

  • On 2/18/24 near Buck Ridge and Muddy Creek we saw at least eight recent avalanches that occurred at various times over the last 1-3 days, natural and/or remote triggered by riders. A group in the parking lot mentioned seeing many slides actively happen in this area on Friday 2/16. Most were 2-3' deep hard slabs, ranging from 50'-500' wide. Photo: GNFAC

  • An avalanche we either triggered from 750-800 feet away or it broke naturally. This avalanche happened when we were riding near the larger of the two avalanches from yesterday, on the south side of Cedar Mtn. It was a wind-loaded slope, actively loading. The avalanche was ~130' wide with 100' of 4-12" deep new snow/wind slab and 30' wide broke almost 3 feet deep on weak snow near the ground. Photo: GNFAC

  • An avalanche we either triggered from 750-800 feet away or it broke naturally. This avalanche happened when we were riding near the larger of the two avalanches from yesterday, on the south side of Cedar Mtn. It was a wind-loaded slope, actively loading. The avalanche was ~130' wide with 100' of 4-12" deep new snow/wind slab and 30' wide broke almost 3 feet deep on weak snow near the ground. Photo: GNFAC

  • An avalanche we either triggered from 750-800 feet away or it broke naturally. This avalanche happened when we were riding near the larger of the two avalanches from yesterday, on the south side of Cedar Mtn. It was a wind-loaded slope, actively loading. The avalanche was ~130' wide with 100' of 4-12" deep new snow/wind slab and 30' wide broke almost 3 feet deep on weak snow near the ground. Photo: GNFAC

  • An avalanche we either triggered from 750-800 feet away or it broke naturally. This avalanche happened when we were riding near the larger of the two avalanches from yesterday, on the south side of Cedar Mtn. It was a wind-loaded slope, actively loading. The avalanche was ~130' wide with 100' of 4-12" deep new snow/wind slab and 30' wide broke almost 3 feet deep on weak snow near the ground. Photo: GNFAC

  • An avalanche we either triggered from 750-800 feet away or it broke naturally. This avalanche happened when we were riding near the larger of the two avalanches from yesterday, on the south side of Cedar Mtn. It was a wind-loaded slope, actively loading. The avalanche was ~130' wide with 100' of 4-12" deep new snow/wind slab and 30' wide broke almost 3 feet deep on weak snow near the ground. Photo: GNFAC

  • This avalanche was triggered by riders from flat terrain far below on February 17. Photo: GNFAC

  • From BSSP on 2/17/24: "Midafternoon we received another report of a skier triggered avalanche in the Lone Lake Circe, specifically The Mullet. The reporting party contacted several ski patrollers via cell phone and confirmed that nobody was injured or had taken the full ride. This avalanche failed near the ground on a high elevation NW facing slope with the weight of a single skier with an estimated size of HS-ASu-R3-D2.5-O."

  • From BSSP on 2/17/24: "Midafternoon we received another report of a skier triggered avalanche in the Lone Lake Circe, specifically The Mullet. The reporting party contacted several ski patrollers via cell phone and confirmed that nobody was injured or had taken the full ride. This avalanche failed near the ground on a high elevation NW facing slope with the weight of a single skier with an estimated size of HS-ASu-R3-D2.5-O."

  • Riders triggered this avalanche remotely on 02/17/2024 while riding near the Bear Creek wilderness boundary. Photo: Anonymous 

Videos- Northern Madison

WebCams


8800' Camera, Lone Peak view

Yellowstone Club, Timberline Chair

Snowpit Profiles- Northern Madison

 

Select a snowpit on the map to view the profile image

Weather Forecast Northern Madison

Extended Forecast for

5 Miles NNW Big Sky MT

Winter Storm Watch April 26, 06:00am until April 28, 06:00amClick here for hazard details and duration Winter Storm Watch
  • Tonight

    Tonight: A slight chance of rain and snow showers between midnight and 1am, then a chance of snow showers.  Mostly cloudy, with a low around 31. South southwest wind 6 to 11 mph becoming northeast in the evening.  Chance of precipitation is 30%. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

    Mostly Cloudy
    then Chance
    Rain/Snow

    Low: 31 °F

  • Thursday

    Thursday: A chance of snow showers before 3pm, then rain and snow showers likely between 3pm and 5pm, then snow showers after 5pm. Some thunder is also possible.  High near 43. South southwest wind 6 to 10 mph becoming west northwest in the afternoon.  Chance of precipitation is 80%. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

    Chance Snow
    Showers then
    Rain/Snow

    High: 43 °F

  • Thursday
    Night

    Thursday Night: Rain and snow showers, becoming all snow after midnight. Some thunder is also possible.  Low around 28. North wind 7 to 10 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

    Rain/Snow
    then Snow

    Low: 28 °F

  • Friday

    Friday: Snow before noon, then snow showers after noon. Some thunder is also possible.  High near 33. North wind 6 to 10 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 3 to 7 inches possible.

    Snow

    High: 33 °F

  • Friday
    Night

    Friday Night: Snow.  Low around 26. North northeast wind 9 to 13 mph, with gusts as high as 18 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

    Snow

    Low: 26 °F

  • Saturday

    Saturday: Snow.  High near 30. North wind around 10 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

    Snow

    High: 30 °F

  • Saturday
    Night

    Saturday Night: A 50 percent chance of snow.  Mostly cloudy, with a low around 25. North northwest wind around 10 mph becoming southwest after midnight.  New snow accumulation of around an inch possible.

    Chance Snow

    Low: 25 °F

  • Sunday

    Sunday: Snow likely, mainly after noon.  Mostly cloudy, with a high near 37. West southwest wind 9 to 14 mph, with gusts as high as 21 mph.

    Snow Likely

    High: 37 °F

  • Sunday
    Night

    Sunday Night: A slight chance of snow showers before midnight, then a slight chance of snow after midnight. Some thunder is also possible.  Mostly cloudy, with a low around 25.

    Slight Chance
    Snow Showers

    Low: 25 °F

The Last Word

We began our daily forecasts on December 7. 130 daily forecasts and 464 reported avalanches later, we wrapped up our daily forecasting season on April 14th. While avalanches remain a concern until the snow is in the rivers, read our SEASON SUMMARY to look back at the heart of the 2023-24 avalanche year.

04 / 19 / 24  <<  
 
this forecast
 
  >>  This is the most recent forecast.