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MSA,
Eric Knoff

Mountain riding on snowmobiles has exploded in popularity over the past 15 years. Every winter more riders hit the backcountry in pursuit of steep faces and untracked powder. This type of riding increases the inherent risk of being caught in an avalanche. Over the past decade, 41 snowmobilers have died in avalanches in Montana - more than any other state in the nation. 

The Avalanche Review,
Doug Chabot

The week of March 19 was a bad one for Central Asia. Heavy snow followed by a downpour of rain introduced their most widespread avalanche cycle in memory. Tajikistan, northern Pakistan and northern Afghanistan had avalanches hit roads and villages, many in the dead of night. 

Doug Chabot

We just wrapped up our 22nd season of avalanche forecasting with 138 advisories.  It was a busy, challenging winter and Mark Staples, Eric Knoff and I want to thank everyone for their support.  

The Avalanche Review,
Doug Chabot

On December 31st, 2011 two people were killed in separate avalanches in the mountains outside of Cooke City, Montana. One victim was a skier; the other a snowmobiler and both were Montana residents. 

Carve,
Doug Chabot

By mid-January over 2,400 people attended one of our 35 avalanche classes. Grade school and graduate students, skiers and snowmobilers, search and rescue groups, ski patrols and businesses attended classes, all there for the same thing—to learn about avalanches. Regardless of the user group, during the Q&A sessions people asked similar questions.  Here’s an attempt to answer the most common ones.

MSA,
Eric Knoff

 During the New Year’s weekend of 2011/2012, avalanches killed 3 people.  Two of these fatalities 

occurred in the mountains near Cooke City and the third in the Flint Range near Phillipsburg, Montana.  
MSA,
Eric Knoff
The snowpack is a record of weather events that take place during the winter.  Heavy snows, wind, even long dry spells, help to create unique layers in the snowpack. The order in which these weather events occur determines both the structure and stability of the pack.

Carve,
Doug Chabot
Christmas is around the corner and everyone will be scrambling for last minute gifts.  How about getting your backcountry partner something that could save his or her life?  Skiers, snowboarders and snowmobilers all need the same safety equipment.  Here are a few ideas to help alleviate Christmas gift stress and backcountry danger with the same present. 
Snowmobile Storm,
Doug Chabot

Avalanches are deadly. They kill more people on public lands than fires, lightning, floods or any other natural event. In the last 10 years 114 snowmobilers have died in avalanches in the United States. Triggering a slide can be terrifying. Getting caught is horrific. Digging out your partner is hell. Assessing snow stability is a difficult skill that’s never mastered. Like every avalanche forecaster I spend most of my days studying snow, yet I still sometimes get it wrong. 

MSA,
Eric Knoff

 Snowmobiling in mountains is risky business.  Once a rider leaves the groomed trail and enters the 

uncontrolled and unpredictable backcountry he/she immediately becomes exposed to a variety of 
hazards.  One of the inherent risks of backcountry snowmobiling is the possibility of triggering or being 
caught in an avalanche.